HYPHE-NATED

K-Pop Dictionary

Essential K-pop Lingo : Ajumma, Ajusshi, Boo Bi Boo Bi, Jagiya and many more

Do you already know how to pronounce Korean consonants and vowels? Cool! Continue the lesson below, but if you need to learn them or need a quick refresher, you can do that for free Complete Beginner Lesson #1 – CONSONANTS & VOWELS : Let’s Learn How to Read and Pronounce Korean alphabet Hangul 한글!

Ajumma-Starter-Guide
This is so accurate lol – The Ajumma Starter Guide by Amy Slatem

Essential K-pop Lingo아줌마 Ajumma (Ajoomma)
(a-jum-ma)

“Married or Middle-aged Woman”
A word for a “married or middle-aged woman” which is often translated as “madam” in English, but when used in certain situations, its nuance is
subtly different. For example, if a young, unmarried woman behaves badly, calling her “ajumma” becomes an insult. This is because there are
negative connotations associated with the word, such as being pushy, loud, and sometimes selfish. The most distinctive characteristic of this word is a women with permed hair, similar to that of a grandmother’s. Some people believe that “ajumma” is the third gender in Korea. It can also be used to address a restaurant waitress.

Example)
Wow, that ajumma literally stole that old man’s seat!
Did you hear that? Jenny became so ajumma after having 2 kids!
That super-curly perm she got makes her look like a total ajumma!
Ajumma! Can we please have another pair of chopsticks?

Watch what happens if you call young ladies in their 20’s ajumma!

Essential K-pop Lingo아저씨 Ajusshi (Ahjussi)
(a-jŏ-ssi)

“Married or Middle-aged Man”
The male counterpart of “ajumma”. This is a word for a “middle-aged man” or “married man” but can be used to address an unfamiliar adult male. It is often translated as “mister” in English. While similar to “ajumma”, there are less negative connotations associated with it. The biggest insult would be calling a young man “ajusshi”, because that means he is old-fashioned or outdated.

Example)
Oppa! That joke is so outdated… So ajusshi!
Ashley: Ajusshi! Can you tell me the directions to Seoul?”
Kyuwon: Um… okay…, but FYI, I am not ajusshi.

Essential K-pop Lingo부비부비 Boo Bi Boo Bi
(bu-bi-bu-bi)

“Grinding”
A type of dirty dancing where a girl stands in front of a guy, placing her hips close to his crotch and. Then she would start rubbing while he places
his hands on her pelvis and holds her. It can be used to refer to any kind of sexy or suggestive dancing that involves close body contact.

Example)
Wonhee: Gross! This drunk dude was doing boo bi boo bi on me!
Nancy: Was he good looking?
Wonhee: No!
Nancy: Oh gross!

Essential K-pop Lingo맛점 Mat Jeom
(mat-jŏm)

“Have a Nice Lunch!”
Abbreviation for “맛있는” (mat it nun, “tasty”) + “점심” (jeom shim, “lunch”). As It’s used mostly among the younger generation as an Internet slang expres￾sion, it shouldn’t be used in formal settings, or to people older than you, or your superiors.

Example)
Oh! It’s lunch time already! Mat jeom, ya’ll!

Essential K-pop Lingo만찢남 Man Jjit Nam
(man-tchin-nam)

Unrealistically Beautiful (Handsome) Man
Abbreviation for “만화를 찢고 나온듯한 남자 (man-hwa-reul jjit-go na-on-deut￾han nam-ja)” which literally translates as “a man who looks as if he has just come out of comic books,” because of his incredible looks.

Example)
People call me man jjit nam not because I look cool like a super hero but more like an ugly villain who gets his ass kicked by a super hero.

Essential K-pop Lingo역주행 Yeok Ju Haeng
(yŏk-ju-haeng)

Climbing The Charts
“역” (yeok, “reverse”) + “주행” (ju haeng, “drive”). A phenomenon in which a song that’s been out for a while but hasn’t received a lot of attention sud￾denly gains popularity, thereby climbing the charts in reverse. The biggest Example) is EXID’s “Up & Down,” where a fancam of their concert went viral on YouTube, giving a belated boost to their old song. Another Example) is be￾ing featured in a CF (commercial) or a movie/drama series.

Example)
WTH? That song is over 10 years old and is ranked #1 on the chart? Why is it making a yeok ju haeng ?

Essential K-pop Lingo오지다 O Ji Da
(o-ji-da)

Sick! / Crazy!
A term that has been used widely by teenagers very recently, and for this reason It’s thought to be a slang expression, but it’s actually a word included in the Korean dictionary, meaning “something very satisfying.”

Example)
Triple Crown? Again? O ji da

I swear to god…

Essential K-pop Lingo민폐 Min Pye
(min-pye)

Public Nuisance
“민” (min) means “people” + “폐” (pye) means “nuisance.” Put together, it means “public nuisance,” and it’s a very important concept in a collective
culture like Korean, because the whole is considered more important than its parts. Some “민폐” Example)s are: taking up two parking slots, bringing your pet to someone else’s place without asking first, talking on the phone in the movie theater.

Example)
I have a habit of eating so loudly and yes I know it’s a min pye.

When I was your age…

Essential K-pop Lingo꼰대 Kkon Dae
(kkon-dae)

Fogey / Stick-In-The-Mud
A slang word for an old-fashioned and stubborn person with zero flexibility who thinks he/she is always right and others are always wrong, therefore constantly resists change, even for the better. Although it refers to an old person, it could also be used for young people who possess all the qualities mentioned above.

Example)
Jimmy is only 15 years old who thinks girls shouldn’t be allowed to vote or educated! What a stupid kkon dae!

Essential K-pop Lingo자기야 Jagiya
(ja-gi-ya)

Honey / Sweetie
“자기” (ja gi) means “sweetheart/honey” and “야” (ya) is a postpositional par￾ticle attached to a name, when calling someone, to make it sound friendly. Put together, “자기야” is an expression meaning “(Hey) Sweetheart.”

Example)
Jenny: Jagiya~ Jagiya~ <3
Mark: Hm… I have a feeling that you need something from me…


The content your enjoying is complimentary from “The K-Pop Dictionary.” If you wish to learn all 500 essential K-pop words and phrases to fully understand what your favorite idols are saying, check it out on Amazon worldwide.

Recommended Resources on Amazon


Fastest Way to Speak Korean
  • Let’s Speak Korean – Learn Over 1,400+ Expressions Quickly and Easily With Pronunciation & Grammar Guide Marks – Just Listen, Repeat, and Learn!
Self-study Korean Books for Beginners
  • Korean for Everyone – Complete Self-Study Program : Beginner Level: Pronunciation, Writing, Korean Alphabet, Spelling, Vocabulary, Practice Quiz With Audio Files
Learn the Most Essential Korean Slang Words and Expressions
  • K-Pop Dictionary – 500 Essential Korean Slang Words and Phrases Every K-Pop Fan Must Know
Learn About Korean Culture
Previous
Next
Sign Up For Our NewsletterAll things Korean delivered right to your inbox.

Korean Culture 101, Korean Lessons, K-Food Recipes and many more. Stay in the know our occasional newsletter!